Our Global Table Adventure: Venezuelan Fruit Punch – Tizana

If my friends had known that I’m writing a blog post about cooking, they would probably: a) call firefighters to report a fire threat in the neighbourhood; b) post comments all over the place warn my readers of risk of food poisoning (if try to follow my recipe at home); c) make sure my kids have plenty of milk and cereals to make themselves an edible super.

Because, ladies and gentlemen, the truth is that I’m a crap cook. When I was an Erasmus student in Granada, my attempt to make pasta in a microwave made me famous all over the town (hopefully we didn’t have smart phones and YouTube accounts back in those days!). My miserable Venezuelan arepas and cachapas made me realize that my way to my husband’s heart definitely did NOT go through his stomach.

Add to it that we live in my grandma’s flat where the kitchen hasn’t been renovated in more than thirty years, the oven dates to the 1970s…and the recipe for a disaster is ready! I know that some people find stuff from Communist Poland retro and cool, but believe me, there’s nothing cool in an oven that either burns up stuff or leaves it raw inside.

My kids seem to have inherited my “talent” in the kitchen; once my son’s infamous Andres’s Angry Cupcakes made it into finals of a competition run by Mommy Shorts blog for the ugliest baked good made by a child.

However, today you can sit back, relax and enjoy this post. First: this recipe doesn’t involve cooking or baking. Second: it’s not my recipe. It’s a recipe by a talented fellow MKB blogger Sasha Martin from Global Table Adventure, a wonderful blog that features recipes from more than 195 countries.

Sasha has recently published a memoire about her culinary journey and to celebrate it, several MKB bloggers have planned to try one of Sasha’s recipes and blog about it. Given my  (lack of) culinary skills and experience we took it easy and decided to prepare Venezuelan Fruit Punch – Tizana.

I love when my children learn about their Venezuelan heritage; what is more,people willingly share my recipes that were succesful since they assume that if we can cook something, everyone else can.

If you would like to try the recipe for yourself, please head on to Sasha’s blog where you can find the original recipe and much more beautiful pictures than those taken in our kitchen: http://globaltableadventure.com/recipe/recipe-venezuelan-fruit-punch-tizana/

We started with reviewing Spanish vocabulary for fruit. Here Michał (a.k.a el Gato) explains what fruit you need to make Tizana:

 

Unfortunately, we didn’t have pineapple or melon like in the original recipe because you can’t get them at a local supermarket in Poland and it was too cold and windy to risk a further trip in hunt for exotic fruit.

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The boys happily chopped the fruit.

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Making fruit salads is also a great way to work on fine motor skills since the pieces of fruit need to be chopped very tiny…”That small, Mummy? Is that right”? – asked Andres.

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After that, while Andres was mixing the fruit, Michał splashed on orange juice and added a little bit of grenadine syrup.

You can see the boys proudly presenting the final product here. Maybe it wouldn’t make the most viewed YouTube cooking tutorial, but at least we had fun and the outcome was yummy! The kids loved it! What is more, since tizana does not contain any sugar, it’s a healthy drink that you can serve to your kids or even bring to a school party without feeling guilty.

If you picture my family happily sipping on tizana to the rhythm of salsa,wait ; my husband had a final point:

– Do you know what we’ve made today? Surprise- a Venezuelan drink that looks like a fruit salad! It’s for a MKB project! – I exclaimed proudly when hubby came from work late in the evening.

– What ? Did you guys make tizana? It’s not about you, I’ve hated tizana all my life! It was a nightmare when they served it at all the parties in Venezuela1 Yuck! When are you going to make a project on MKB about roasted meat?

So much about the way to a man’s heart going through his stomach.

Want to learn more about Sasha’s blog and memoir? Read the interview with Sasha by Olga Mecking on the MKB website!

Also, check  other MKB bloggers’ Global Table Adventures here.

Austrian Chocolate Tart by Non Toy Gifts

Dark Chocolate Guiness Cake by The European Mama

Hot Algerian Lasagna by A Crafty Arab

Apple Pancakes by Mommy Maleta

Dhal Baht by Let the Journey Begin

Perfect Omelet by Ketchup Moms

Samoan Tropical Salad by Island Mum in Denmark

Gingered Pineapple Ice Cream Sundae with Toasted Coconut by Crazy Little Family Adventure

Cod Fish Feijoada by The Piri-Piri Lexicon

Romeo&Juliet by Vagabonding with Kids

Potato Curry by Milk, Crafts and Honesty

Sankaya- Thai Pumpkin Custard by Pack-n-Go Girls

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5 thoughts on “Our Global Table Adventure: Venezuelan Fruit Punch – Tizana”

  1. All that work and excitement and then your husband’s comment…how funny! I think I might crank up the heat one day mid-winter, make a batch of tizana, and pretend I’m at the beach in Venezuela!

    1. Thanks for your comment Laura! Lol, my husband is the most picky eater I’ve ever known, he’s one of those tourists who always have fried chicken and fries at the restaurants on holiday because he finds foreign food funny 😉 Had a laugh about the tizana thing with my MIL today, she confirms that my hubby has hated it since he was a kid! Whatever, the rest of the family loved it! 😉

    1. Thanks! We had fun with that project! If you were here, maybe we could try a more complicated recipe from Sasha’s website….our Pan de Jamon for the New Year’s Eve wasn’t bad! 😉

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